Teachers and students involved relationship

teachers and students involved relationship

Supportive student-teacher relationships improve motivation, inspire achievement, and protect One involved personal criticism (e.g.,"I'm disappointed in you."). Teachers know that getting physically involved with students is not right and they are aware that it might lead to them not only losing their jobs. Positive relationships with learners also increase teachers' job-satisfaction. . Parental involvement, especially in areas of socio-economic deprivation, does not.

Once again, this is a positive relations strategy as well as an instructional strategy.

2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents

You can also let students know that you have positive expectations for them by referring to past successes Kerman et al. When you tell a student that you know he will behave appropriately at recess because he was successful yesterday, you help build confidence in the student and increase his chance for success.

And after a student demonstrates good behavior or academic achievement in a specific situation, telling her you knew she would be successful Kerman et al. Students need to know that their teachers respect them and have confidence in them.

Using these different strategies to consistently communicate your positive expectations will work wonders. We challenge you to begin using one or two of these strategies today to build high expectations and positive teacher-student relations. Correcting Students in a Constructive Way Correcting and disciplining students for inappropriate behaviors is a necessary and important part of every teacher's job.

However, it doesn't have to be a negative part of your job. In fact, you can actually build positive relationships when you correct students. If you don't believe this, think for just a minute about students you have had in the past who came back to school to visit you.

Often it is the students who were the most challenging and with whom you had to spend the most time who continue to visit you over the years.

Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

This is due to the positive relationships you developed with them. The goal in correcting students should be to have them reflect on what they did, be sorry that they disappointed you, and make a better choice in the future. I'm going to be sure I don't get caught next time. If you allow students to keep their dignity, you increase the chance that they will reflect on their behavior and choose their behaviors more wisely in the future. The correction process will be counterproductive if students are corrected in a manner that communicates bitterness, sarcasm, low expectations, or disgust.

The goal is to provide a quick, fair, and meaningful consequence while at the same time communicating that you care for and respect the student. Steps to Use When Correcting Students Review what happened Identify and accept the student's feelings Review alternative actions Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation Let the student know that all students are treated the same Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future Imagine that Johnny hit Sam because Sam called his mother a name.

This is how you could put these disciplinary steps in place: Discuss the incident with Johnny.

Student-teacher relationships: Why emotional support matters

Begin with fact finding to be sure that you are appropriately correcting the student. The worst way to affect teacher-student relationships is to unfairly discipline a student.

Identify and accept the student's feelings. Tell Johnny that you understand why it upset him to hear somebody call his mother a name and that you, too, would be upset if someone maligned your mother. It's important to understand that this step communicates that you respect and understand his feelings but that you are not accepting his actions.

Chapter 1. Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

Go over with Johnny the different actions he could have taken, such as ignoring the remark or reporting it to a teacher. Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation.

teachers and students involved relationship

Remind Johnny of the building policy of not fighting and that the rule is if anyone hits another student, he or she will be sent to the office and possibly be suspended from school. Let the student know that all students are treated the same. Make sure that Johnny understands that all students must adhere to the policy and that any student who disregards the rule will suffer the consequences.

Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence. Communicate with the office about what happened and send Johnny to the office.

Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action.

Tell Johnny that you are disappointed that his actions have led to this situation. Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future. Remind Johnny that, although you do not approve of his actions and do not like to send him or any student to the office, you like him and know that he will make a better choice next time.

Also tell him that you are there to support him and work through these issues with him in the future. In addition to your following these steps when correcting a student, it is important to keep some key philosophical precepts in mind. First of all, remember to correct the student in a private location.

Although it is not always possible to remove a student from the classroom, do your best to prevent visual access by other students as you discipline. Public correction can foster feelings of anger, embarrassment, and bitterness; it can also become a sideshow for the other students. Finally, remember to stay calm and avoid frustration. The worst thing you can do is to invoke a consequence when you are angry or upset, as this can lead to regrettable actions on your part.

Key Philosophical Precepts When Correcting Students Correct in a private location Treat students as you want your own children treated Stay calm Avoid frustration It is also important to follow certain steps after disciplining a student.

Images of supportive primary school teachers do not. The impact of student-teacher relationships Experiments like these bolster our intuitions.

teachers and students involved relationship

Secure, supportive relationships are especially important for young children, and may have far-reaching consequences. But what about older kids? The German experiments seem consistent with the idea that the personal equation matters less as children get older. But there are other explanations. Most of the children in this study had known their preschool teachers for years -- much longer than they had know their primary school teachers.

Perhaps kids need more time to feel personally connected. And here's another possibility: Student-teacher relationships, even friendly, supportive ones, tend to assume a less nurturing, less physical aspect as kids move from preschool to primary school. Might kids suffer for it?

teachers and students involved relationship

But regardless of how we account for these "speed-of-problem-solving" results, we should keep in mind: Secure, supportive student-teacher relationships are linked with a variety of beneficial effects, and these continue beyond preschool. How supportive teachers protect kids from stress The researchers analyzed daily fluctuations of the hormone, cortisol, as the children went through a typical week in elementary school.

They learned that most kids began the school week with fairly normal stress hormone profiles, but showed increasingly atypical patterns as the week progressed -- a sign that these kids were under strain. That suggests that positive relationships have a measurable impact in the short-term, even among elementary school children.

And there is more. Kids who experience high quality student-teacher relationships in the early years tend to have fewer behavior problems later on Hamre and Piata ; Rudasill et al