The teacher pupil relationship

the teacher pupil relationship

The concept teacher-pupil relationship is so general that reaction to it can serve almost as a projective test. To some, it immediately con jures up the image of. Positive teacher-student relationships draw students into the process of learning and promote their desire to learn (assuming that the content material of the. Strong teacher student relationships are crucial. To a large extent, the nature of your relationship with your students dictates the impact that you have on them.

Most of my relationships since then have been really awful and violent. I can't trust men in positions of authority.

I was predicted four A-grades at A-level and had great plans for university. It all started with him. If he had not done what he did to me when I was too young to know what was going on, my life now would be very different.

He was her form tutor. The relationship was intense: But they had to keep it a secret in school.

the teacher pupil relationship

He dumped her nine days before her A-levels — and then invigilated at her exams. Sophie didn't achieve anything like the grades she had been predicted but still got into university. Then he rekindled the relationship. When it ended a second time, she fell apart, dropping out of university and into a life of chaos and self-destruction.

All these years later, he still deserves to be punished for what he did, doesn't he? Is it my responsibility to try to protect the girls at the school he's now teaching at? Prior to that act, the age of consent — 16 — was the only issue. Teaching unions claim pupil-teacher affairs are "very rare". Between andteachers were prosecuted for relationships with pupils, according to reports.

One school has dealt with no fewer than five incidents. When, inChristopher Reen, 31, a classroom supervisor at Headlands school in Bridlington, was jailed for three years and four months after admitting six counts of sexual activity with a year-old female pupil, it emerged that four former staff at the same school had faced the courts in recent years over inappropriate sexual conduct.

There has never been a prosecution. She has, however, fought for years to get him struck off the teachers' register — something she finally achieved in August this year.

Chapter 1. Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

The relationship became nasty, violent, obsessive and physically and sexually abusive. It took just one conversation for them to make her realise she had been manipulated and abused. No one from these organisations contacted me.

the teacher pupil relationship

I was a mess and couldn't go through with prosecution, but I always stuck to my story. They all knew what the allegations were, but none of them did anything to investigate.

Everything was brushed under the carpet. The teacher moved and continued teaching in a different part of Scotland. The police investigated for more than a year and ultimately charged the teacher with, she thinks, rape and assault.

Nevertheless, the teacher was suspended by the council in April and finally struck off the teaching register last month. I see how he manipulated my year-old self and I realise how someone of my age would know, absolutely, that it was completely wrong and inappropriate to get into a relationship with someone of that age.

And I wish someone had told me that it was never, ever my fault. Sikes first fell in love with her husband when she was 14 and he was her year-old teacher. Conversely, we give less time to students in whom we have little confidence. When you quickly give up on a student who is struggling with a response, it is clear to everyone in the classroom that you don't expect him or her to come up with the right answer. What you will find when you make a conscious effort to extend the length of latency you allow for low-achieving students is that these students will begin to pay more attention, become more actively involved in discussions, and minimize their behavior issues.

One thing you can do is ask a teaching peer to observe your instruction and chart the length of the latency periods you are giving each student from the time you ask the question until you move on to another student.

the teacher pupil relationship

It is especially interesting to find out which students get longer latency periods from you. Latency Chart in Seconds Paul Brown: In analyzing the chart, it is easy to see that Donna and Mary are consistently given more latency and, therefore, more chances to give a correct response than are the other students. If this were your classroom, you could try to make sure that in future discussions and question-and-answer periods you give longer latency periods to other students as well before moving on.

Give Hints and Clues to Help Students Answer Questions You also communicate positive expectations by giving hints and clues to your students. It is important that we communicate to all our students that we have high expectations for their success, and one way to do this is by giving more hints and clues to all students, especially the low-performing students.

Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

Think about a reading lesson in which a student struggles to sound out a word. If you provide too many hints and clues, you may actually give the student the answer.

Also, after a number of hints, it may be that the only student who doesn't know the answer is the one being called on, which ends up being an embarrassing experience. The important point, however, is to use hints and clues with all students to communicate that you have high expectations for the entire class. This helps build positive teacher-student relations. Tell Students They Have the Ability to Do Well Another way to communicate positive expectations to students is by directly telling them they have the ability to do well.

When you tell your students you have confidence that they can handle a difficult assignment or improve their behavior, you impart a very powerful message.

Students often will work hard and behave appropriately to prove that your confidence in them is justified.

Every child needs to have at least one significant adult in his or her life who believes that he or she can do well. Ideally, children would hear this from their parents, but the sad truth is that is not always the case. Teachers have the unique opportunity and privilege to communicate daily to a number of students that they believe in them.

10 Inappropriate Student and Teacher Relationships

What a gift to be able to be that significant adult in even one student's life. Using this strategy might lead a teacher to say this to a student: You've been working very hard on remembering to write down your thinking as you solve math problems, and I know you can transfer that skill to this test. I'll check back with you later. Once again, this is a positive relations strategy as well as an instructional strategy. You can also let students know that you have positive expectations for them by referring to past successes Kerman et al.

When you tell a student that you know he will behave appropriately at recess because he was successful yesterday, you help build confidence in the student and increase his chance for success.

And after a student demonstrates good behavior or academic achievement in a specific situation, telling her you knew she would be successful Kerman et al.

Students need to know that their teachers respect them and have confidence in them. Using these different strategies to consistently communicate your positive expectations will work wonders. We challenge you to begin using one or two of these strategies today to build high expectations and positive teacher-student relations. Correcting Students in a Constructive Way Correcting and disciplining students for inappropriate behaviors is a necessary and important part of every teacher's job.

However, it doesn't have to be a negative part of your job. In fact, you can actually build positive relationships when you correct students.

If you don't believe this, think for just a minute about students you have had in the past who came back to school to visit you. Often it is the students who were the most challenging and with whom you had to spend the most time who continue to visit you over the years.

the teacher pupil relationship

This is due to the positive relationships you developed with them. The goal in correcting students should be to have them reflect on what they did, be sorry that they disappointed you, and make a better choice in the future.

I'm going to be sure I don't get caught next time. If you allow students to keep their dignity, you increase the chance that they will reflect on their behavior and choose their behaviors more wisely in the future.

the teacher pupil relationship

The correction process will be counterproductive if students are corrected in a manner that communicates bitterness, sarcasm, low expectations, or disgust. The goal is to provide a quick, fair, and meaningful consequence while at the same time communicating that you care for and respect the student. Steps to Use When Correcting Students Review what happened Identify and accept the student's feelings Review alternative actions Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation Let the student know that all students are treated the same Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future Imagine that Johnny hit Sam because Sam called his mother a name.

This is how you could put these disciplinary steps in place: