Meet in simple past tense

High English | Simple Past Tense with Regular or Irregular Verbs

meet in simple past tense

Either is possible. In my personal opinion it comes down to context. Was this a fleeting acquaintance or someone you are likely to take up with. Here are the most common irregular verbs in English, with their past tenses: meet pay put run say sell send set sit speak spend stand take teach tell think. This is a reference page for meet verb forms in present, past and participle Simple / Indefinite Present Tense. He/She/It meets. I meet. You/We/They meet.

The three incomplete or progressive tenses describe an unfinished action: It is also possible to combine a complete or perfect tense with an incomplete tense to describe an action which was in progress and then finished: The simple present is used when the precise beginning or ending of the action, event or condition is unknown or unimportant to the meaning of the sentence.

The highlighted verbs in the following sentences are in the simple present tense. Each sentence describes an action taking place in the present: Joe waits patiently while Bridget books the tickets. The shelf holds three books and a vase of flowers.

The crowd moves across the field in an attempt to see the rock star. The Stephens sisters are both very talented; Virginia writes and Vanessa paints. Bridget annoys Walter by turning corners too quickly. The simple present expresses general truths such as scientific facts, as in the following sentences: Rectangles have four sides. The moon circles the earth once every 28 days.

meet in simple past tense

Calcium is important to the formation of strong bones. The simple present indicates a habitual action, event or condition, as in the following sentences: My grandmother sends me jigsaw puzzles each spring.

It seems that bad things happen in threes. We never finish jigsaw puzzles because the cat always eats some of the pieces. The simple present is also used to write about works of art, as in the following sentences: The Lady of Shallot weaves a tapestry while watching the passers-by in her mirror. Lear rages against Cordelia and only belatedly realizes that she, not her sisters, loves him. The play ends with an epilogue spoken by the fool. The simple present refers to a future event when used with an adverb or adverbial phraseas in the following sentences: The doors open in 10 minutes.

The premier arrives on Tuesday. My French classes end next week. The publisher distributes the galley proofs next Wednesday. The lunar eclipse begins in exactly 43 minutes. The present progressive tense While the simple present and the present progressive are sometimes used interchangeably, the present progressive tense emphasizes the continuing nature of actions, events or conditions.

The highlighted verbs in the sentences below are in the present progressive tense, which emphasizes the ongoing nature of the action: Joe is dusting all the shelves on the second floor of the shop. The strikers are pacing up and down in front of the factory.

Meet Past Tense

CBC is broadcasting the hits of the 70s this evening. The present progressive occasionally refers to a future event when used with an adverb or adverbial phrase, as in the following sentences: The doors are opening in 10 minutes.

The premier is arriving on Tuesday. My French classes are ending next week. The publisher is distributing the galley proofs next Wednesday. The present perfect tense The present perfect tense describes actions that began in the past and continue into the present or that have just been completed at the moment of speaking or writing. The present perfect often suggests that a past action still has an effect upon something happening in the present. The highlighted compound verbs in the following examples are in the present perfect tense: Example Explanation They have not delivered the documents we need.

The Past Simple Tense: How to Form It and When to Use It

This sentence suggests that the documents were not delivered in the past and that they are still undelivered. The health department has decided that all children should be immunized against meningitis. The present perfect tense suggests that the decision made in the past is still of importance in the present.

The government has cut university budgets; consequently, the dean has increased the size of most classes. Here both actions took place sometime in the past and continue to influence the present.

The heat wave has lasted three weeks. The present perfect tense indicates that a condition the heat wave began in the past and continues to affect the present. Donna has dreamt about frogs sitting in trees every night this week. Here the action of dreaming began in the past and continues into the present. The present perfect progressive tense Like the present perfect, the present perfect progressive tense describes actions, events or conditions that began in the past and continue in the present.

The present perfect progressive, however, stresses the ongoing nature of the action, condition or event. The highlighted verbs in the following sentences are in the present perfect progressive tense and suggest that the actions began in the past and continue in the present: That dog has been barking for three hours; I wonder if Joe will call the owner.

I have been relying on my Christmas bonus to pay for the gifts I bought for my family. They have been publishing this comic book for 10 years. We have been seeing geese flying south all afternoon. Even though the coroner has been examining the corpse since early this morning, we still do not know the cause of death. The simple past tense The simple past tense describes actions, events or conditions that occurred in the past, before the moment of speaking or writing.

The highlighted verbs in the following sentences are in the simple past tense and describe actions taking place at some point in the past: A flea jumped from the dog to the cat.

Bridget gripped the hammer tightly and nailed the boards together. The gemstones sparkled in a velvet-lined display case. Artemisia Gentileschi probably died in The village elder began every story by saying, "A long time ago when the earth was green. While actions referred to using the present progressive tense have some connection to the present, actions referred to using the past progressive tense have no immediate or obvious connection to the present.

The ongoing actions took place and were completed at some point well before the time of speaking or writing. The highlighted verbs in the following examples are in the past progressive tense: Example Explanation The cat was walking along the tree branch.

This sentence describes an action that took place over a period of time in the past and has no immediate relationship to anything occurring in the present. The past perfect tense is used to express an action completed before another action took place 3. The simple past tense is used to express an action which covered a time period in the past, but is now ended 4.

Past Progressive Tense

Choose the sentence with the past perfect and the simple past forms. The patient had died before the ambulance reached the hospital. She had got married by the time she started working. The could not open the locker because they had mislaid the keys.

meet in simple past tense

All of the above sentences have both the simple past and the past perfect tenses. All the three sentences have two actions and possess both the past perfect and the simple past tenses 5. Choose the sentence with the past perfect form. The bell had not gone before I reached school. The bell went before I reached school. The bell had gone before I reached school. Both options 1 and 3 are in past perfect form but option 2 is not.

Both options 1 and 3 are right. Option 1 is in the negative form while option 3 is in the positive form. Option 2 is in the simple perfect form 6. I received your letter yesterday. I had received your letter yesterday. I have received your letter yesterday. I have not received your letter yesterday. The past perfect form is written by using 'had' before the past participle of the verb receive.

This tense is used to denote an action or event which has been completed before some point of time. Option 1 is in the simple past tense. Option 3 is in the present perfect tense.